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Help us to solve the biggest challenge of our generation

How do we want to live tomorrow?

The future of our planet depends entirely on how we manage it in the future – how we produce food tomorrow, how we design mobility and how we generate energy.

Whether in current accounts, savings accounts or equity funds – banks use their customers' money to grant loans or make investments in coal, weapons and other industries that harm our planet and us humans without our consent.

Money can also become part of the solution. This is where we come into play. Together with you. We finance renewable energies, social projects in the Global South and offset tonnes and tonnes of carbon.

Investments

Tomorrow’s capital increases with every new user. That’s how we are financing positive change together.

3.207.270

by 4.212 users

70

invested in sustainable projects

0

invested in yesterday's industries

What is the Tomorrow capital?

Our capital is the deposits that our Tomorrow customers have in their accounts. Our promise to you is that not a single cent from these deposits will make its way to sectors like armaments, factory farming or coal-fired power plants – as they often do with conventional banks. This “divestment” achieves a lot, but it's only the beginning. Tomorrow uses part of the funds to finance sustainable projects. We’re already making good headway with one project – global micro-loans. And another one is already in the starting blocks – more news coming on that soon.

How do you select the projects?

Sustainable businesses need financing. This applies to the smallholder who needs new seeds; to the start-up wanting to launch their social business idea, and to the wind farm looking to expand its capacity. The decision of which projects are sustainable enough for us to channel our funds to in the future is not based on gut feelings. It comes together after a clear process.

Step 1 – We summarise the Sustainable Development Goals of the United Nations – protecting natural resources, ensuring basic needs, protecting the climate and empowering disadvantaged groups. Only projects that contribute to these four challenges are potential candidates for funding.

Step 2 – This is followed by the so-called "ESG evaluation", which evaluates the ecological, social and ethical footprint of the project – what's the situation with fair wages, the carbon footprint and employee diversity? Only if a positive balance is ensured here (and the project is not on our “negative list” because they provide arms, mass livestock, etc.), do we consider financing the project.

Step 3 – The final evaluation is performed by our external advisory board. We are currently putting this body together. With Markus Beckmann and Andreas Neukirch, we already have two experienced candidates on board and others will follow. You can read more on our website.

Step 4 – Only at this stage are the projects checked for financial sustainability. This is done in consultation with the risk management of our partner solarisBank.

More about the “micro-loans” project

Part of Tomorrow's customer deposits are channelled into a microfinance fund that funds several dozen institutions around the world, meaning micro-loans can be granted. Micro-loans are small loans that are used predominantly in developing countries. They are aimed at people with low incomes. As these people are generally unable to secure traditional loans, they have no access to traditional financing – and therefore no chance to make a decent living for themselves.

Micro-loans give these people the chance to borrow money under fair conditions, which they can invest, for example, in an oven or a sewing machine, to set up a business and increase their standard of living. Micro-loans are a means of self-help and allow people to find their own way out of poverty. They are usually granted by specialised, non-governmental organisations known as Micro-finance institutions (MFI).

Funded by Tomorrow, this project focuses on Latin America, Asia and Eastern Europe. The selected institutions there ensure that the micro-loans support local economic development, that the interest rates for microcredits are fair and that the borrower isn’t left with excessive debts.

On average, the micro-credits amount to around €1,300 and are primarily given to women. Often the institutes also offer further training to the borrowers, e.g. courses in bookkeeping, to help them manage their microenterprise more successfully. While such offers open up new perspectives for clients, they reduce the default risk for microfinance institutions.

More about the “Green Bonds and Social Bonds” projects

Bonds are securities that are traded on the stock exchange. They can be acquired by private investors (like you) or institutional investors (like Tomorrow or our partner Solarisbank). Financial institutions (in this case Förderbank Nordrhein-Westfalen, the Nordic Investment Bank and Nederlandse Waterschapsbank N.V., which issue the green and social bonds) raise capital in this way to refinance loans. Here, they must pay back the capital to the creditor (in this case Tomorrow/Solarisbank) after a specific term, together with interest.

About Förderbank NRW’s Green Bonds

The Green Bonds are financial products issued by Förderbank NRW that are geared exclusively towards refinancing environmentally friendly projects that explicitly address the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). The bonds were issued for the seventh time in 2019 and have been able to finance numerous green initiatives in North Rhine-Westphalia in recent years. The main aim of the bonds is to expand renewable energies and safeguard clean drinking water. In the past, for instance, proceeds from the bond have been used to renature the river Emscher, which has led to enormous ecological benefits for the region as a whole.

NRW’s green bonds portfolio is divided up into four different areas. The largest part (roughly two thirds) of the total of €500 million proceeds from the bonds goes towards expanding renewable energies (SDG 7 & 13) in North Rhine-Westphalia. Here, the main focus is on constructing wind power plants, while photovoltaic systems are also part of the portfolio. Another key focus of the green bonds is on modernising public facilities (SDG 3, 11 & 13), for instance by establishing heat recovery systems in hospitals to render them more energy-efficient. Green bonds also finance loans to private individuals converting their own homes with a view to optimising resource usage. The fourth core area relates to transport. Here, “clean transport” projects are implemented that, for example, use electric buses or allow electric charging stations to be built (SGD 13 & 11). We are investing €9,800,000 in a green bond issued by Förderbank NRW.

About the Nordic Investment Bank’s Environmental Bond

The Environmental Bond is a green bond issued by the Nordic Investment Bank, which is geared towards expanding renewable energies and promoting energy efficiency in buildings. These investments will help to create new energy plants but also to reinforce existing infrastructure. The investments are concentrated above all on Sweden, Norway and Finland. One exciting pilot project that is funded by the bond is centred on electric ferries in Norway.

All supported projects are geared explicitly towards the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). NIB’s green bonds portfolio is divided up into six different areas. The largest of these – accounting for 27 percent of total bonds – is invested in expanding renewable energies, especially electricity generated from wind, solar, tidal and wave power plants (SDG 7). However, part of the funds is also invested, for example, in developing, designing and producing new technologies for renewable energies (SDG 13).

25 percent of funds are invested in measures for increasing the energy efficiency of buildings. This is done by rehabilitating existing buildings, including making improvements to heating systems, insulation, lighting or electrical devices. Another 25 percent of funds is invested in water conservation and protection, which includes wastewater treatment and flood protection (SDG 6). However, freshwater and marine ecosystems are also being protected and restored by means of projects for expanding nature reserves and preserving biodiversity (SDG 13; SDG 14). Clean transport solutions are another area supported by the bonds, accounting for 12 percent of invested funds. These are based mainly on electricity or sustainable biofuels and corresponding transport infrastructure (e.g. rails, charging stations, fuel distribution systems, bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure). One pilot project in this area involves electric ferries, which are already being used in Norway (SDG 11). We are investing €3,600,000 in the Nordic Investment Bank’s Environmental Bond.

About Nederlandse Waterschapsbank N.V.’s “Housing Bond”

The SDG Housing Bond is a social bond issued by Nederlandse Waterschapsbank N.V. that is geared towards creating social housing in the Netherlands. The apartments and rents are adapted to income levels and are capped with a maximum rent of €710.68 per month. 80 percent of this new housing will be allocated exclusively to households and families with a maximum income of €36,798 per year (2018). 10 percent of the guaranteed benefits will go to people with special needs (e.g. due to health-related conditions)

However, the investment also takes into account other areas such as sustainable communities, diversity, integration, energy efficiency, quality of life and resident satisfaction and is geared explicitly towards the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

More than 50 percent of investments go towards modernising existing houses, particularly with regard to improving energy efficiency. This involved equipping houses with solar panels and replacing old heating systems with more efficient ones. In addition, windows, roofs and walls were insulated more effectively (SDG 7; SDG 11). For instance, 56 percent of the residential area is rented as social housing. 11 percent of the apartments are available for single parents, predominantly women (SDG 1; SDG 5; SDG 10).

A further part of the funds is invested in improving the district and providing facilities for the community as a whole. For example, a Social Management Label is assigned for individual neighbourhoods based both on quantitative survey findings and on qualitative insights from talks with residents. Following this, suitable measures are then undertaken on location based on the outcome in each case (SDG 3; SDG 11; SDG 16). We are investing €6,000,000 in Nederlandse Waterschapsbank N.V.’s housing bond.



Our capital is the deposits that our Tomorrow customers have in their accounts. Our promise to you is that not a single cent from these deposits will make its way to sectors like armaments, factory farming or coal-fired power plants – as they often do with conventional banks. This “divestment” achieves a lot, but it's only the beginning. Tomorrow uses part of the funds to finance sustainable projects. We’re already making good headway with one project – global micro-loans. And another one is already in the starting blocks – more news coming on that soon.

Sustainable businesses need financing. This applies to the smallholder who needs new seeds; to the start-up wanting to launch their social business idea, and to the wind farm looking to expand its capacity. The decision of which projects are sustainable enough for us to channel our funds to in the future is not based on gut feelings. It comes together after a clear process.

Step 1 – We summarise the Sustainable Development Goals of the United Nations – protecting natural resources, ensuring basic needs, protecting the climate and empowering disadvantaged groups. Only projects that contribute to these four challenges are potential candidates for funding.

Step 2 – This is followed by the so-called "ESG evaluation", which evaluates the ecological, social and ethical footprint of the project – what's the situation with fair wages, the carbon footprint and employee diversity? Only if a positive balance is ensured here (and the project is not on our “negative list” because they provide arms, mass livestock, etc.), do we consider financing the project.

Step 3 – The final evaluation is performed by our external advisory board. We are currently putting this body together. With Markus Beckmann and Andreas Neukirch, we already have two experienced candidates on board and others will follow. You can read more on our website.

Step 4 – Only at this stage are the projects checked for financial sustainability. This is done in consultation with the risk management of our partner solarisBank.

Part of Tomorrow's customer deposits are channelled into a microfinance fund that funds several dozen institutions around the world, meaning micro-loans can be granted. Micro-loans are small loans that are used predominantly in developing countries. They are aimed at people with low incomes. As these people are generally unable to secure traditional loans, they have no access to traditional financing – and therefore no chance to make a decent living for themselves.

Micro-loans give these people the chance to borrow money under fair conditions, which they can invest, for example, in an oven or a sewing machine, to set up a business and increase their standard of living. Micro-loans are a means of self-help and allow people to find their own way out of poverty. They are usually granted by specialised, non-governmental organisations known as Micro-finance institutions (MFI).

Funded by Tomorrow, this project focuses on Latin America, Asia and Eastern Europe. The selected institutions there ensure that the micro-loans support local economic development, that the interest rates for microcredits are fair and that the borrower isn’t left with excessive debts.

On average, the micro-credits amount to around €1,300 and are primarily given to women. Often the institutes also offer further training to the borrowers, e.g. courses in bookkeeping, to help them manage their microenterprise more successfully. While such offers open up new perspectives for clients, they reduce the default risk for microfinance institutions.

Bonds are securities that are traded on the stock exchange. They can be acquired by private investors (like you) or institutional investors (like Tomorrow or our partner Solarisbank). Financial institutions (in this case Förderbank Nordrhein-Westfalen, the Nordic Investment Bank and Nederlandse Waterschapsbank N.V., which issue the green and social bonds) raise capital in this way to refinance loans. Here, they must pay back the capital to the creditor (in this case Tomorrow/Solarisbank) after a specific term, together with interest.

About Förderbank NRW’s Green Bonds

The Green Bonds are financial products issued by Förderbank NRW that are geared exclusively towards refinancing environmentally friendly projects that explicitly address the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). The bonds were issued for the seventh time in 2019 and have been able to finance numerous green initiatives in North Rhine-Westphalia in recent years. The main aim of the bonds is to expand renewable energies and safeguard clean drinking water. In the past, for instance, proceeds from the bond have been used to renature the river Emscher, which has led to enormous ecological benefits for the region as a whole.

NRW’s green bonds portfolio is divided up into four different areas. The largest part (roughly two thirds) of the total of €500 million proceeds from the bonds goes towards expanding renewable energies (SDG 7 & 13) in North Rhine-Westphalia. Here, the main focus is on constructing wind power plants, while photovoltaic systems are also part of the portfolio. Another key focus of the green bonds is on modernising public facilities (SDG 3, 11 & 13), for instance by establishing heat recovery systems in hospitals to render them more energy-efficient. Green bonds also finance loans to private individuals converting their own homes with a view to optimising resource usage. The fourth core area relates to transport. Here, “clean transport” projects are implemented that, for example, use electric buses or allow electric charging stations to be built (SGD 13 & 11). We are investing €9,800,000 in a green bond issued by Förderbank NRW.

About the Nordic Investment Bank’s Environmental Bond

The Environmental Bond is a green bond issued by the Nordic Investment Bank, which is geared towards expanding renewable energies and promoting energy efficiency in buildings. These investments will help to create new energy plants but also to reinforce existing infrastructure. The investments are concentrated above all on Sweden, Norway and Finland. One exciting pilot project that is funded by the bond is centred on electric ferries in Norway.

All supported projects are geared explicitly towards the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). NIB’s green bonds portfolio is divided up into six different areas. The largest of these – accounting for 27 percent of total bonds – is invested in expanding renewable energies, especially electricity generated from wind, solar, tidal and wave power plants (SDG 7). However, part of the funds is also invested, for example, in developing, designing and producing new technologies for renewable energies (SDG 13).

25 percent of funds are invested in measures for increasing the energy efficiency of buildings. This is done by rehabilitating existing buildings, including making improvements to heating systems, insulation, lighting or electrical devices. Another 25 percent of funds is invested in water conservation and protection, which includes wastewater treatment and flood protection (SDG 6). However, freshwater and marine ecosystems are also being protected and restored by means of projects for expanding nature reserves and preserving biodiversity (SDG 13; SDG 14). Clean transport solutions are another area supported by the bonds, accounting for 12 percent of invested funds. These are based mainly on electricity or sustainable biofuels and corresponding transport infrastructure (e.g. rails, charging stations, fuel distribution systems, bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure). One pilot project in this area involves electric ferries, which are already being used in Norway (SDG 11). We are investing €3,600,000 in the Nordic Investment Bank’s Environmental Bond.

About Nederlandse Waterschapsbank N.V.’s “Housing Bond”

The SDG Housing Bond is a social bond issued by Nederlandse Waterschapsbank N.V. that is geared towards creating social housing in the Netherlands. The apartments and rents are adapted to income levels and are capped with a maximum rent of €710.68 per month. 80 percent of this new housing will be allocated exclusively to households and families with a maximum income of €36,798 per year (2018). 10 percent of the guaranteed benefits will go to people with special needs (e.g. due to health-related conditions)

However, the investment also takes into account other areas such as sustainable communities, diversity, integration, energy efficiency, quality of life and resident satisfaction and is geared explicitly towards the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

More than 50 percent of investments go towards modernising existing houses, particularly with regard to improving energy efficiency. This involved equipping houses with solar panels and replacing old heating systems with more efficient ones. In addition, windows, roofs and walls were insulated more effectively (SDG 7; SDG 11). For instance, 56 percent of the residential area is rented as social housing. 11 percent of the apartments are available for single parents, predominantly women (SDG 1; SDG 5; SDG 10).

A further part of the funds is invested in improving the district and providing facilities for the community as a whole. For example, a Social Management Label is assigned for individual neighbourhoods based both on quantitative survey findings and on qualitative insights from talks with residents. Following this, suitable measures are then undertaken on location based on the outcome in each case (SDG 3; SDG 11; SDG 16). We are investing €6,000,000 in Nederlandse Waterschapsbank N.V.’s housing bond.

Climate protection contribution

We protect 1 m2 of rainforest for every single euro you spend on your Tomorrow card

3.207.270 m2

rainforest protected

70

trees protected

30 kg

CO2 offset

What is the climate protection contribution?

Every time you use your Tomorrow card, you are making a valuable contribution to protecting the climate. This is how it works: when you use your card, the seller (that can be an organic supermarket or your favourite café) pays a so-called “interchange fee” to the cardholder’s bank. This is a globally established system – and, for many banks, an important source of income. Most customers aren’t even aware that this goes on. We want to do things differently – which is why we invest the charges in global climate protection projects. In this way, we can work together, day after day, making a small contribution to a better tomorrow.

How do the numbers stack up?

For each card payment, the merchant pays 0.2% of the value of a transaction to the cardholder’s bank. It’s the same for Tomorrow. A share of this sum is used to cover the actual costs of processing the transaction. That leaves 0.13% of each transaction. We invest all of this money in international climate protection projects. With the Impact Board in the Tomorrow app you can follow the contribution of the Tomorrow community and see exactly what you have personally contributed as a customer. The figures are based on the fact that for every euro Tomorrow pays to the project coordinator Climate Partner, 780 m² of the Brazilian rainforest are protected. An average of 132 trees grow on this area. Accordingly, a tree occupies an area of around 6 m². These figures are based on a term of another 30 years. The areas are therefore guaranteed to be protected by your money until 2049. Another key number is the amount of carbon dioxide that is bound by the Tomorrow Climate Protection contribution because forests, and rainforests in particular, store a lot of CO2. This number refers to the amount of carbon dioxide that is bound by the protection of the trees in each year. Every euro donated to the project by Tomorrow ensures that 200 kg of CO2 per year are stored. These values are regularly used by various organisations (DNV, USA, Inc,. DNV, GL) and comply with international regulations on the storage of CO2.

What kind of projects are supported?

In the future, we’ll be financing a range of different projects. At the beginning, the whole Tomorrow contribution will be going towards a rainforest protection project in Portel, Brazil. Why there? Here are some of the local issues. The threatened areas were originally inhabited and managed by indigenous peoples. Weak legal regulations regarding land use mean that the region near the Amazon is highly ecologically endangered by deforestation. The areas are considered fertile and easily accessible, so industrial agricultural companies try their utmost to exploit the areas for the cultivation of soy. The deforestation threatens the already meagre livelihoods of the "Ribeirinhos", as the Amazonians are called, since they mostly live on fishing or subsistence farming. In addition to the living and economic areas, deforestation also threatens many animal species.

In order to counteract this development, the forest protection project divides up the endangered area into several parcels of land and monitors them carefully. In this way, the land is protected from unwanted appropriate by the agricultural industry and saved from illegal deforestation. The project thereby keeps this area of rainforest safe, and protects the homes of families who live there. The local population are actively involved in the process: the Ribeirinhos are trained in monitoring techniques, so that jobs are created alongside the protection of the rainforest.



Every time you use your Tomorrow card, you are making a valuable contribution to protecting the climate. This is how it works: when you use your card, the seller (that can be an organic supermarket or your favourite café) pays a so-called “interchange fee” to the cardholder’s bank. This is a globally established system – and, for many banks, an important source of income. Most customers aren’t even aware that this goes on. We want to do things differently – which is why we invest the charges in global climate protection projects. In this way, we can work together, day after day, making a small contribution to a better tomorrow.

For each card payment, the merchant pays 0.2% of the value of a transaction to the cardholder’s bank. It’s the same for Tomorrow. A share of this sum is used to cover the actual costs of processing the transaction. That leaves 0.13% of each transaction. We invest all of this money in international climate protection projects. With the Impact Board in the Tomorrow app you can follow the contribution of the Tomorrow community and see exactly what you have personally contributed as a customer. The figures are based on the fact that for every euro Tomorrow pays to the project coordinator Climate Partner, 780 m² of the Brazilian rainforest are protected. An average of 132 trees grow on this area. Accordingly, a tree occupies an area of around 6 m². These figures are based on a term of another 30 years. The areas are therefore guaranteed to be protected by your money until 2049. Another key number is the amount of carbon dioxide that is bound by the Tomorrow Climate Protection contribution because forests, and rainforests in particular, store a lot of CO2. This number refers to the amount of carbon dioxide that is bound by the protection of the trees in each year. Every euro donated to the project by Tomorrow ensures that 200 kg of CO2 per year are stored. These values are regularly used by various organisations (DNV, USA, Inc,. DNV, GL) and comply with international regulations on the storage of CO2.

In the future, we’ll be financing a range of different projects. At the beginning, the whole Tomorrow contribution will be going towards a rainforest protection project in Portel, Brazil. Why there? Here are some of the local issues. The threatened areas were originally inhabited and managed by indigenous peoples. Weak legal regulations regarding land use mean that the region near the Amazon is highly ecologically endangered by deforestation. The areas are considered fertile and easily accessible, so industrial agricultural companies try their utmost to exploit the areas for the cultivation of soy. The deforestation threatens the already meagre livelihoods of the "Ribeirinhos", as the Amazonians are called, since they mostly live on fishing or subsistence farming. In addition to the living and economic areas, deforestation also threatens many animal species.

In order to counteract this development, the forest protection project divides up the endangered area into several parcels of land and monitors them carefully. In this way, the land is protected from unwanted appropriate by the agricultural industry and saved from illegal deforestation. The project thereby keeps this area of rainforest safe, and protects the homes of families who live there. The local population are actively involved in the process: the Ribeirinhos are trained in monitoring techniques, so that jobs are created alongside the protection of the rainforest.

Tomorrow Zero

Thousands of customers are already offsetting their carbon footprint by funding social projects in developing countries

3.207.270 kg

Less CO2 from
biogas plants in Vietnam

70 kg

Less CO2 by supporting small-scale farmers in Peru

30 kg

Less CO2 through
water purification in Uganda

What is Tomorrow Zero?

As the first such account in Germany, Tomorrow Zero enables you to offset your carbon footprint by investing in climate protection projects in developing countries. Maybe you already know about carbon offsetting from flying, with many providers, you can offset your flight with a one-time climate donation. Tomorrow Zero goes one step further. With our premium account you don’t offset a single flight, but the amount an average German person emits in total per year.

Why is such an account needed?

The ecological footprint of the German population is far too big. Each of us produces an average of 11.3 tonnes of CO2 per year. To limit global warming to 2 degrees, this figure should only be 2 tonnes. So we need to reduce our environmental footprint, for example, by sourcing green electricity, flying less and switching to organic products. But that alone won’t be enough. Only if we understand climate protection as a joint task can we rise to the challenge. With Tomorrow Zero you can therefore invest in climate protection where it has the most impact, in developing countries.

Which projects are supported?

In concrete terms, you are funding three climate protection projects with Tomorrow Zero. You are supporting small-scale farmers in Peru and therefore protecting the rainforest threatened by deforestation. With your help, clean biogas plants will be installed in Vietnam. And in Uganda, boreholes are being drilled that give people access to clean drinking water, removing the need to boil water over an open fire, which is harmful to the environment. Want to know more? We’d be happy to present the projects that we selected together with our partner ClimatePartner.



As the first such account in Germany, Tomorrow Zero enables you to offset your carbon footprint by investing in climate protection projects in developing countries. Maybe you already know about carbon offsetting from flying, with many providers, you can offset your flight with a one-time climate donation. Tomorrow Zero goes one step further. With our premium account you don’t offset a single flight, but the amount an average German person emits in total per year.

The ecological footprint of the German population is far too big. Each of us produces an average of 11.3 tonnes of CO2 per year. To limit global warming to 2 degrees, this figure should only be 2 tonnes. So we need to reduce our environmental footprint, for example, by sourcing green electricity, flying less and switching to organic products. But that alone won’t be enough. Only if we understand climate protection as a joint task can we rise to the challenge. With Tomorrow Zero you can therefore invest in climate protection where it has the most impact, in developing countries.

In concrete terms, you are funding three climate protection projects with Tomorrow Zero. You are supporting small-scale farmers in Peru and therefore protecting the rainforest threatened by deforestation. With your help, clean biogas plants will be installed in Vietnam. And in Uganda, boreholes are being drilled that give people access to clean drinking water, removing the need to boil water over an open fire, which is harmful to the environment. Want to know more? We’d be happy to present the projects that we selected together with our partner ClimatePartner.

Tomorrow is a B Corp.

More about the certification
B Corp Logo
B Corp Logo

Tomorrow is a B Corp.

More about the certification