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GIVE THE PLANET SOME CREDIT

How we can make a positive impact

HOW DO WE WANT TO LIVE TOMORROW?

The future of our planet depends entirely on how we manage it in the future: How will we produce food tomorrow, how will we design mobility, how will we generate energy - and for what purposes? For all of these areas there are countless examples: There is organic farming and factory farming, there are eBikes and gas guzzlers, there are solar panels and brown coal, ... Sure- the world cannot be divided into good and evil, it is not black and white. But we can see clearly where a positive footprint will be left - and where there'll just be scorched earth.


From Coal to
Renewables


From factory farming to
zu Organic Agriculture


From traffic jams to
modern mobility




BANKING SHOULDN'T COST THE EARTH..

Money plays a decisive role in the question of what kind of economy we'll end up with. Money works - but what does it actually do? Whether the funds are sitting in a current account, a savings account or in an equity fund: banks use their customers' money to grant loans or make investments. Today, money in this way often, far too often, becomes part of the problem: it finances industries that operate at the expense of future generations. That could be the arms industry or fossil fuels - the list is long. We'd like to change that: We have created a strict list of criteria that specifies where your money will end up and where you can be absolutely sure it won't. You can find it here.

But money can also become part of the solution: A forward-looking economy needs capital. This applies to the microcredit for the small farmer who needs new seeds; to the start-up that wants to launch a social business idea; and to the wind farm that wants to create additional capacities. This is where we come into play. It's by no means just us: At the beginning of 2018, the EU Commission decided on a comprehensive overhaul of the financial sector in order to achieve global climate protection goals. For this alone, around 170 billion euros have to be invested annually or directed into sustainable industries. Much more is needed to achieve the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals. Those are huge numbers. But you have to start somewhere. Our money will be part of it.

TOMORROW
CAPITAL
IN REAL TIME

3.207.270

by 4.212 users

70

invested in sustainable projects

0

invested in yesterday's indestries

What is the Tomorrow capital?

The capital is the "customer deposits" which the Tomorrow-Community has in its accounts. Our promise to you: not a single cent from these deposits will make its way to outdated sectors like armaments, factory farming or coal-fired power plants – as they often do with conventional banks. This "divestment" achieves a lot, but it's only the beginning: Tomorrow uses part of the funds to finance sustainable projects. We're already there with one project: global microcredits. Another project is on the starting blocks - more on that soon.

How do you select projects?

Sustainable businesses need financing. This applies to the smallholder who needs new seeds; to the startup wanting to launch their social business idea, and to the wind farm looking to expand its capacity. The definition of which projects are sustainable enough for us to channel funds there in the future is not a matter of gut feeling. It comes together after a clear process.

Step 1: We have summarised the Sustainable Development Goals of the United Nations: protecting natural resources, ensuring basic needs, protecting the climate and empowering disadvantaged groups. Only projects that contribute to these four challenges are potential candidates for funding.

Step 2: This is followed by the so-called "ESG evaluation", which evaluates the ecological, social and ethical footprint of the project: what's the situation with fair wages, with the carbon footprint and diversity in personnel? Only if a positive balance is ensured here (and the project is not our "negative list" due to arms, mass livestock, etc.), do we consider financing the project.

Step 3: The final evaluation is performed by our external advisory board. We are currently putting this body together. With Markus Beckmann and Andreas Neukirch, we already have two experienced candidates on board, and others will follow. You can read more on our website.

Step 4: Only at this stage are the projects checked for financial sustainability. This is done in consultation with the risk management of our partner solarisBank.

More about the "Microcredit" project

Part of Tomorrow's customer deposits will be channelled into a microfinance fund, which will fund several dozen institutions around the world, meaning microloans can be made. Microcredits are small credits that are used predominantly in developing countries. They are aimed at people with low incomes. Because these people can't generally secure traditional loans, they have no access to traditional finance – and thus no chance to build a real livelihood.

Microcredits give these people the chance to borrow money under fair conditions. They can thus invest small amounts of money, e.g. in an oven or a sewing machine, found a business and raise their standard of living. Microcredits are a means of self-help and allow people to find their own way out of poverty. The credits are generally given by specialised, non-governmental organisations, which are called Micro-finance institutions (MFI).

Funded by Tomorrow, this project focuses on Latin America, Asia and Eastern Europe. The selected institutions there ensure that the microcredits support local economic development, that the interest rates for microcredits are fair, and that borrower over-indebtedness is avoided. The selected institutions of the KCD Fund ensure that the micro-credits support local economic development, that the interest rates for micro-credits are fair and that borrower over-indebtedness is avoided.

On average, the micro-credits amount to around €1,300 and are primarily given to women. Often the institutes also offer further training to the borrowers, e.g. courses in bookkeeping, in order to manage the microenterprise more successfully. While such offers open up new perspectives for clients, they reduce the risk of credit default for microfinance institutions.

More about the "Green Bonds" project

Bonds are securities that are traded on the stock exchange, and can be purchased by private individuals like you or institutions like Tomorrow or our partner Solarisbank. Credit institutions (in this case, the Förderbank Nordrhein Westfalen, which issues the Green Bond), borrow capital in this way in order to refinance credit. According to this arrangement, they must repay their creditors (in this case Tomorrow, or solarisBank) the capital sum and interest after a certain period of time. The Green Bond is a finance product from the Förderbank NRW, which is exclusively targeted at the refinancing of environmentally friendly products which explicitly address the "Sustainable Development Goals" (in short, SDG) of the United Nations. The bond was offered in 2019 for the seventh time, and has been able to finance numerous green initiatives in the North Rhein-Westphalia region of Germany in the last few years. The aims of the bonds are, in particular, the expansion of regenerative energy and the protection of clean drinking water. Funds raised by the bond have, in the past, been used to help return the river Emscher to its natural state, which has been proven to bring enormous added value for the region.

The NRW Green Bonds portfolio is divided into four areas. The larger part (around two thirds) of the bond's total of 500 million Euros go towards the expansion of renewable energies (SDG 7 and 13) in the North Rhine-Westphalia area. As a key area of focus, it has enabled the construction of wind farms, and solar energy plants also form part of the portfolio. Another key area of the Green Bond is the modernisation of public facilities. (SDG 3, 11 and 13). For example, hospitals have been renovated in order to achieve energy efficiency by ensuring they retain heat better. The Green Bonds are also used to give loans to private individuals who are renovating their homes in order to use resources more carefully. The fourth main area of the bond concerns transport. Projects which enable the operation of electric busses or the construction of charging columns for e-cars are gathered under the general heading of Clean Transport (SGD 13 and 11).



The capital is the "customer deposits" which the Tomorrow-Community has in its accounts. Our promise to you: not a single cent from these deposits will make its way to outdated sectors like armaments, factory farming or coal-fired power plants – as they often do with conventional banks. This "divestment" achieves a lot, but it's only the beginning: Tomorrow uses part of the funds to finance sustainable projects. We're already there with one project: global microcredits. Another project is on the starting blocks - more on that soon.

Sustainable businesses need financing. This applies to the smallholder who needs new seeds; to the startup wanting to launch their social business idea, and to the wind farm looking to expand its capacity. The definition of which projects are sustainable enough for us to channel funds there in the future is not a matter of gut feeling. It comes together after a clear process.

Step 1: We have summarised the Sustainable Development Goals of the United Nations: protecting natural resources, ensuring basic needs, protecting the climate and empowering disadvantaged groups. Only projects that contribute to these four challenges are potential candidates for funding.

Step 2: This is followed by the so-called "ESG evaluation", which evaluates the ecological, social and ethical footprint of the project: what's the situation with fair wages, with the carbon footprint and diversity in personnel? Only if a positive balance is ensured here (and the project is not our "negative list" due to arms, mass livestock, etc.), do we consider financing the project.

Step 3: The final evaluation is performed by our external advisory board. We are currently putting this body together. With Markus Beckmann and Andreas Neukirch, we already have two experienced candidates on board, and others will follow. You can read more on our website.

Step 4: Only at this stage are the projects checked for financial sustainability. This is done in consultation with the risk management of our partner solarisBank.

Part of Tomorrow's customer deposits will be channelled into a microfinance fund, which will fund several dozen institutions around the world, meaning microloans can be made. Microcredits are small credits that are used predominantly in developing countries. They are aimed at people with low incomes. Because these people can't generally secure traditional loans, they have no access to traditional finance – and thus no chance to build a real livelihood.

Microcredits give these people the chance to borrow money under fair conditions. They can thus invest small amounts of money, e.g. in an oven or a sewing machine, found a business and raise their standard of living. Microcredits are a means of self-help and allow people to find their own way out of poverty. The credits are generally given by specialised, non-governmental organisations, which are called Micro-finance institutions (MFI).

Funded by Tomorrow, this project focuses on Latin America, Asia and Eastern Europe. The selected institutions there ensure that the microcredits support local economic development, that the interest rates for microcredits are fair, and that borrower over-indebtedness is avoided. The selected institutions of the KCD Fund ensure that the micro-credits support local economic development, that the interest rates for micro-credits are fair and that borrower over-indebtedness is avoided.

On average, the micro-credits amount to around €1,300 and are primarily given to women. Often the institutes also offer further training to the borrowers, e.g. courses in bookkeeping, in order to manage the microenterprise more successfully. While such offers open up new perspectives for clients, they reduce the risk of credit default for microfinance institutions.

Bonds are securities that are traded on the stock exchange, and can be purchased by private individuals like you or institutions like Tomorrow or our partner Solarisbank. Credit institutions (in this case, the Förderbank Nordrhein Westfalen, which issues the Green Bond), borrow capital in this way in order to refinance credit. According to this arrangement, they must repay their creditors (in this case Tomorrow, or solarisBank) the capital sum and interest after a certain period of time. The Green Bond is a finance product from the Förderbank NRW, which is exclusively targeted at the refinancing of environmentally friendly products which explicitly address the "Sustainable Development Goals" (in short, SDG) of the United Nations. The bond was offered in 2019 for the seventh time, and has been able to finance numerous green initiatives in the North Rhein-Westphalia region of Germany in the last few years. The aims of the bonds are, in particular, the expansion of regenerative energy and the protection of clean drinking water. Funds raised by the bond have, in the past, been used to help return the river Emscher to its natural state, which has been proven to bring enormous added value for the region.

The NRW Green Bonds portfolio is divided into four areas. The larger part (around two thirds) of the bond's total of 500 million Euros go towards the expansion of renewable energies (SDG 7 and 13) in the North Rhine-Westphalia area. As a key area of focus, it has enabled the construction of wind farms, and solar energy plants also form part of the portfolio. Another key area of the Green Bond is the modernisation of public facilities. (SDG 3, 11 and 13). For example, hospitals have been renovated in order to achieve energy efficiency by ensuring they retain heat better. The Green Bonds are also used to give loans to private individuals who are renovating their homes in order to use resources more carefully. The fourth main area of the bond concerns transport. Projects which enable the operation of electric busses or the construction of charging columns for e-cars are gathered under the general heading of Clean Transport (SGD 13 and 11).

TOMORROW
CLIMATE PROTECTION
IN REAL TIME

3.207.270 m2

rainforest saved

70

trees saved

30 kg

CO2

What's climate protection contribution?

Every time you use your Tomorrow card, you're making an active contribution to climate protection. This is how it works: When you use your card, the seller (that can be an organic supermarket or your favourite cafe) pays a so-called "interchange fee" to the bank who issued the card. This is a globally established system, and an important source of income for many banks. As a customer, this passes you by entirely. We want to make a difference here - and use the change for global climate protection projects. In this way, we can work together, day after day, making a small contribution to a better tomorrow.

How do the numbers stack up?

For each card payment, the merchant pays 0.2% of the value of a transaction to the bank from which the customer's card originated. It's the same for Tomorrow. A share of this sum will be used to cover the actual costs of processing the transaction. That leaves 0.13% of each transaction. We are putting this all of this money into international climate protection projects. The Impact Board of the Tomorrow app lets you follow the contribution of the Tomorrow community and what you have personally contributed as a customer. The figures are based on the fact that, for every euro that Tomorrow pays to the project coordinator Climate Partner, 780 square meters of the Brazilian rainforest are protected. An average of 132 trees grow on this area. Accordingly, a tree occupies an area of around 6 square metres. These figures are based on a term of another 30 years. The areas are therefore guaranteed to be protected by your money until 2049. Another key number is the amount of carbon dioxide that is bound by the Tomorrow Climate Protection contribution. Because forests store CO2, and rainforests store a particularly large amount. This number refers accordingly to the amount of carbon dioxide that is bound by the protection of the trees in each year. Every euro donated to the project by Tomorrow ensures that 200 kg of CO2 per year are stored. These values are regularly used by various organisations (DNV, USA, Inc,. DNV, GL) and comply with international regulations on the storage of CO2.

What kind of projects are supported?

In the future, we’ll be financing a range of different projects. At the beginning, the whole Tomorrow contribution will be going towards a rainforest protection project in Portel, Brazil. Why there? Here are some of the local issues. The threatened areas were originally inhabited and managed by indigenous peoples. Weak legal regulations regarding land use mean that the region near the Amazon is highly ecologically endangered by deforestation. The areas are considered fertile and easily accessible, so industrial agricultural companies try their utmost to exploit the areas for the cultivation of soy. The deforestation threatens the already meagre livelihoods of the "Ribeirinhos", as the Amazonians are called, since they mostly live on fishing or subsistence farming. In addition to the living and economic areas, deforestation also threatens many animal species.

In order to counteract this development, the forest protection project divides up the endangered area into several parcels of land and monitors them carefully. In this way, the land is protected from unwanted appropriate by the agricultural industry and saved from illegal deforestation. The project thereby keeps this area of rainforest safe, and protects the homes of families who live there. The local population are actively involved in the process: the Ribeirinhos are trained in monitoring techniques, so that jobs are created alongside the protection of the rainforest.



Every time you use your Tomorrow card, you're making an active contribution to climate protection. This is how it works: When you use your card, the seller (that can be an organic supermarket or your favourite cafe) pays a so-called "interchange fee" to the bank who issued the card. This is a globally established system, and an important source of income for many banks. As a customer, this passes you by entirely. We want to make a difference here - and use the change for global climate protection projects. In this way, we can work together, day after day, making a small contribution to a better tomorrow.

For each card payment, the merchant pays 0.2% of the value of a transaction to the bank from which the customer's card originated. It's the same for Tomorrow. A share of this sum will be used to cover the actual costs of processing the transaction. That leaves 0.13% of each transaction. We are putting this all of this money into international climate protection projects. The Impact Board of the Tomorrow app lets you follow the contribution of the Tomorrow community and what you have personally contributed as a customer. The figures are based on the fact that, for every euro that Tomorrow pays to the project coordinator Climate Partner, 780 square meters of the Brazilian rainforest are protected. An average of 132 trees grow on this area. Accordingly, a tree occupies an area of around 6 square metres. These figures are based on a term of another 30 years. The areas are therefore guaranteed to be protected by your money until 2049. Another key number is the amount of carbon dioxide that is bound by the Tomorrow Climate Protection contribution. Because forests store CO2, and rainforests store a particularly large amount. This number refers accordingly to the amount of carbon dioxide that is bound by the protection of the trees in each year. Every euro donated to the project by Tomorrow ensures that 200 kg of CO2 per year are stored. These values are regularly used by various organisations (DNV, USA, Inc,. DNV, GL) and comply with international regulations on the storage of CO2.

In the future, we’ll be financing a range of different projects. At the beginning, the whole Tomorrow contribution will be going towards a rainforest protection project in Portel, Brazil. Why there? Here are some of the local issues. The threatened areas were originally inhabited and managed by indigenous peoples. Weak legal regulations regarding land use mean that the region near the Amazon is highly ecologically endangered by deforestation. The areas are considered fertile and easily accessible, so industrial agricultural companies try their utmost to exploit the areas for the cultivation of soy. The deforestation threatens the already meagre livelihoods of the "Ribeirinhos", as the Amazonians are called, since they mostly live on fishing or subsistence farming. In addition to the living and economic areas, deforestation also threatens many animal species.

In order to counteract this development, the forest protection project divides up the endangered area into several parcels of land and monitors them carefully. In this way, the land is protected from unwanted appropriate by the agricultural industry and saved from illegal deforestation. The project thereby keeps this area of rainforest safe, and protects the homes of families who live there. The local population are actively involved in the process: the Ribeirinhos are trained in monitoring techniques, so that jobs are created alongside the protection of the rainforest.